Future Forum - Germany's discussion board for Drum & Bass and urban music  

Zurück   Future Forum > The Drum'n'Bass Scene > Was geht in der Szene?

Antwort
 
Themen-Optionen Ansicht
Alt 30.06.2004, 09:35   #1
hustlin l.
Hardcore Head
 
Benutzerbild von hustlin l.
 
Registriert seit: 17.09.2003
Beiträge: 8.959
Exclamation Teebee Interview

Transcript of Teebee Interview with Will Jackson for Zebra Magazine 30 June 2004

Will: Hello, uh, Teebee?

Teebee: Speaking.

W: My name’s Will Jackson, I’m calling from Melbourne. Ah, to do an interview for Zebra Magazine.

T: That’s cool.

W: You up for it?

T: Yeah man, definitely. I already got the message about an hour ago. So I was kind of waiting for you to call.

W: Sweet as man. Um, I’ve done a few of these interviews and I generally just ask some random questions and all that sort of shit, and I thought I’d start off by asking if there was anything that you wanted to talk about.

T: Well, um, I’d like to talk about my upcoming album, just in general my work in relation to Photek and what’s going on with my label over the next sort of year or so.

W: Well cool, that’s pretty much what I was going to ask you anyway. Just to sort of set the scene for my readers, can I ask where you’re at and what you’re up to at the moment?

T: At the moment I’m in Norway. I’m having a week holiday doing nothing but a remix and playing immense amounts of Playstation, that’s what I’ve been doing.

W: What’s your favourite Playstation game?

T: I’m actually playing… You know the European Cup Soccer is on at the moment, so I’m playing Euro 2004. Just between the matches, that’s all I do. So that’s pretty much it. I’m having a week off. I just came off a big tour and it’s just I need a little break, as you all know I’m heading out to Australia in a minute.

W: Where were you touring before this break?

T: I had about fourteen gigs in sixteen days in the States and then I went back to Europe and did four shows in and around London and then another week just all over Europe and then I got back here, so it’s pretty much five weeks without any rest so it’s good just to get the legs up and stretch out for a bit.

W: So you’re obviously still based in Norway then?

T: Well, I’m kind of based in Norway and London and LA depending what I’m doin’ and where I’m at. I mean, I tend to spend a lot of time in LA at the moment ‘cause that’s where Photek lives. We’re working together at the moment trying to sort out a few things and so I’m spending quite a bit of time there, I’d say about as much as a fifth of the year with him in LA and then about two-fifths in England, and two-fifths in Norway. So it’s kind of a never ending cycle you know, and I’m not a creature of habit as well, so if I stay in one place for too long I tend to get really restless. But this is where my prime studio is, the kind of studio that I built from scratch is still in Norway. I’ve got a tiny setup in London and Photek’s obviously in LA.

W: How’s preparations for the album going?

T: It’s good. The album’s finished, vinyl-wise it got mastered yesterday, and it looks like a release date in September for the world. I’m trying to sort out distribution for Australia, as well, but it looks like it’s only going to be on import at the moment. But you never know. The vinyl is going to be a four-piece with what I consider the eight strongest tracks on the album. Liquid Light’s on there that I pulled back from Prototype. There’s some really big tunes on there that a lot of people have been playing, so I’ve got hopes for it, I reckon it’s my best album so far, so we’ll see what people think. And as far as the CD version goes there will be two different editions, there’s going to be one edition for Europe, a double CD with CD one ten tracks the original album tracks and CD two’s going to be like me mixing up my best twelve inches from the last two years. And for America and Asia, there’s gonna be another edition where Photek’s gonna be the executive producer binding the tracks together and CD two’s gonna be an exclusive mix of pure unreleased Teebee and Photek stuff.

W: When you’re making an album, do you have a concept in mind? How do you approach it?

T: I normally do, but not this time. This time basically what I did I just did tracks that I liked, and went in a little bit deeper than I have on any of my albums as far as production goes. I’ve gone really deep into every track, trying to make every element as good as I can and try and take the whole production standard of drum ‘n’ bass to the level that I believe that it should be at, where it maybe was a couple of years ago. Things have dumbed-down drastically like in the last couple of years, with even some of the major players not even paying attention and it sounds like they’re just knocking out beats in fifteen minutes. Because drum ‘n’ bass in like ninety-six to like ninety-eight was considered to be like the most cutting edge advanced music form in the world. I mean, advanced in every shape and form in the world aint necessarily what’s right, but I’d like to see a certain challenge in my music and so instead of moaning about it I’m trying to do something about it.

W: Cool. Just going back a bit, with Through the Eyes of a Scorpion, just for personal interest, listening to it and some of the lyrics on the tracks, to be honest it sounded like a breakup album…

T: Oh, oh really? You know what? In a way, you’re right. I went through a… that’s weird, that’s funny, ‘cause no one’s ever like actually like mentioned that… I went through not one but a series of breakups during that album, and I actually made most of the tracks just being f**k angry but the paradox of it all was that I was angry for getting caught, know what I mean? So it wasn’t really… yeah, like the album had some heartache, and I went through some bad moments, but at the end of the day, like the tracks are like me being talked to. And it’s like me being put in my place and I’m kind of mocking that in the most disturbing form. I’ve had some comments from some of the girls involved, in that time, and they’re like: “Oh my f**k god, you are such a dick. Like, not even are you doing this, you’re rubbing it into our faces afterwards.” Yeah, I’ve matured a bit since that tho, I’ve understood that the world is not as forgiving as I want it to be and I should be a bit more forgiving as well and try not to step so hard on other people’s toes because at the end of the day it’s going to come back at you man. Yeah, I’ve learned it the hard way. So I’m trying to stay fairly on point.

W: What do you mean you’ve learnt the hard way? Can you give us an example?

T: Well, I’ve learned the hard way basically, like being caught playing several play fields at one time is never a good thing and it’s morally wrong but I honestly believe it’s not in man’s nature to be completely faithful. And I’m not saying that as a joke, I’m saying that as I honestly do believe that it is not. And I’m seriously trying to and it’s looking a lot better at the moment.

W: Was there a conscious like, for that and like Black Science Labs, did you have a concept going into those?

T: Black Science Labs was basically, because me and K, Polar, did an album before Black Science Labs called Black Science. But Black Science Labs was the name of my old studio and basically Black Science Labs was kind of my statement to the world, because it was my first artist album, and it was what was eventually to break me out overseas and kind of bring me into the international market. I just wanted to flex on that album. Show technicality, because I was still musically not up to my point on that album, I was still trying to find myself but technically I knew I was already on point. So I basically um… hold on, someone’s ringing on the doorbell. One moment. Ahlo? Cominen. That was just my sister comin’ in. Ah, but technically I was on point. So that’s kind of why I made it as a sci fi experiment to be taken as an audio journey rather than as a big musical project. Because if you listen back to the album, the album’s really cold. There is a couple of musical pieces on there, but in general it’s all about, how can you f**k up these drums? And, check out how I do my fills and there’s no way you can make your strings dive like this, sort of thing. So at the moment, I’d say I’ve mellowed down a lot the last three years and back then for me it was a lot about competition in general, just competition about, just a sec… [something in Norwegian] …it was just competition for me. Drum ‘n’ bass was just a massive competition of who can draw sound basically. I mean, I want it to be like this today as well because during that time, that was the time I learned the most that was the time I was most on point, I wouldn’t slack with anything, I’d make sure every little thing was perfect while now some of the old heroes, like the old stars of drum ‘n’ bass, it seems like they’ve lost all their substance and kind of a lot of the weight that was carrying the scene. And that is why things have gone a little bit sideways the last couple of years. So in a way this big jump up, kind of clowny revolution has been great for my side as a massive welcome because it’s brought people back into drum ‘n’ bass and if you still keep to your guns and show them that’s there’s something else out there you might convert one third of them to what you believe in.

W: So Photek. Working with him… how did you hook up with Photek?

T: He got in touch with me. And actually Rico, which is the label manager at SRD which is one of the biggest independent distributors of vinyl to the whole world, basically set up a meeting with me in London and he basically told me that it’s in your best interests to be at that meeting, but he didn’t tell me who I was meeting. So I flew to London, I was really anxious wondering if I’d done something wrong to someone, and then I’m sitting there and Photek’s walking up the stairs with a bright smile on his face and I’m like, oh he didn’t, and he asked me there man cause he’s heard loads of my tunes, cause I was going to do an album with Moving Shadow, and he basically said, I’ve heard all your tunes, they’re f**k amazing I want you on Photek. And like, Photek was one of the people that brought my attention to technically advanced engineering and he was the don in making something that’s really hard to do extremely minimal and easily approachable and for me it was an honour, I mean, yeah man, I’m on the team. And just for me to have someone that was my mentor come to me and tell me that “You know what, I think I’m gonna ally with you because I don’t wanna fight you” to me was a big honour and I’m eternally grateful for that. Things have worked out really well. The album unfortunately didn’t come on Photek as planned because there was financial issues with my publisher that I had to sort out but still I’ve licensed it to him for the American and Asian version and as we’re speaking we’re trying to get a joint artist album done. So yeah, that’s probably gonna be something hopefully done by next year.

W: How has working with him affected your production?

T: It hasn’t really affected me tremendously because once you know studio engineering and once you know how to make a drum break sound snappy or how to make bassline breathe, you’ve pretty much cracked it. I mean, there’s a million ways of doing things, and obviously I’ve learned shortcuts on things that would have taken four or five hours, he’s got broken down to like half an hour but then again there’s things I do that he don’t even know how to do, and he’ll be like: “oh, ok…” So it’s a win-win situation for both of us. Obviously his experience within movies and other genres of music and his contact network and general experience has been a tremendous help to me not just that but like he’s a really wise person, he’s older than me – I’m 28 and he’s 33 – so he’s got an extra five years in the limelight on me and plus he’s worked with all the big ones, he’s worked with Bowie and Bjork. It’s good to have someone that knows the guidelines and knows the bullshit of the real business which we’re about to enter into. Because we’re doing loads of things for movies at the moment and the hip hop market as well, we’ve got loads of projects going on there but at the end of the day it’s drum ‘n’ bass where we’re at and we’re kind of on a mission just to bring it back to its purest and most advanced form. So, I know we’ve got Goldie on the team and there’s a few of us not quite happy about how things have been going down the last year and what kind of music’s been coming out so we kinda want to show the world that we’re still here and we’re firing on all cylinders.

W: I read in you’re bio you once said “It’s time to f**k up the rule books”. What did you mean by that?

T: There is no rules man. And whoever wrote the rules needs to go scrap ‘em. The reason I do drum ‘n’ bass is because there is no rules and somewhere along the lines someone wrote a rule book: you gotta have something that definitely works in the club, amen, you gotta make sure the intro of your track’s mixable, you gotta make em predictable otherwise other DJs won’t play it unless it’s like this and this and this. That is bullshit. Them DJs need to step their game up a little bit. Because music to me has always been an adventure and should be an adventure and the moment you create everything so structured it’s mathematically correct every single time it gets boring because you can only take two plus two so many times before you know it by heart you know. So just in general like making things that people react to, like making sounds that people don’t know how I’ve done them or stay away from the obvious soft synths or the obvious breaks and all that, just trying to be a little bit kind of, create an identity for myself rather than just walking on a path that a million people have been tramping on.

W: What’s happening with Subtitles at the moment?

T: Subtitles has been going really well. We’ve signed loads of new artists on there. I’ve got Chris.SU from Hungary, he’s done me a twelve, I’ve got new boys Fracture and Neptune from London amazing kind of avant guarde breakbeat scientists are doing twelves. I mean Subtitles is stepping up the game because we’ve been in the game for so long now that I have sort of established artists willing to have me go first in on their tracks. Subtitles has been like a statement and marker of quality regardless of whether it’s the most mellow tunes or the hardest tunes we’ve been there for years now and people are acknowledging that. So I’ve also got a Silent Witness twelve, I’ve got remixes coming in from Cause for Concern and Total Science and Stakka and Skynet and Photek and it’s just going to be a good year, I’ve pretty much got the next fifteen releases lined up. So I’m really happy about that, and we’ve just got a deal with this company called Future Tracks so everything’s going to be available as digital distribution, like .mp3 downloads.

W: Is that similar to Beatport?

T: I don’t know about Beatport, but it’s pretty much like an ITunes version for electronic music. And hopefully we’ll have a deal with ITunes as well before the end of the year, we’re trying to work that out at the moment.

W: I think Violence has got together with ITunes.

T: Yeah, Hive’s a very smart man and a wicked producer as well. So, he’s always on the forefront man.

W: I have to ask you, because he’s one of mates’ favourite artists, what do you think of Phace?

T: Phace? What the German? I f**k LOVE him man. I love him. I’ve got an EP of him coming out, I’ve got four tracks. It’s Now, Brainwave, Response Signal and Vitamin P. I might even drop it as Subtitles 40 because I love his tracks so much. The guy is unbelievable. He’s like, such a nice guy, as he’s got his world divided into where he has his entire kind of job life, his girlfriend, and he’s being all proper and like living the normal life and then there’s the drum ‘n’ bass side to him. And he’s just so happy just to be on Subtitles. And he’s like, mate this is as far as I want to go I just want to be on Subtitles because I basically tell him that you come on my label, because his production is so good anyway, that I just tell him that it doesn’t matter what you do, because I know it’s gonna be good and I’m not going to interfere on your creativity. So whatever you do, if you wanna put it out I’m gonna put it out no questions asked. So I’m basically gonna provide him with a creative playground so he can just blossom as an artist ‘cause that is something I always wanted when I grew up as an artist but always tended to be dictated by the labels I was on and Subtitles is not about that. Subtitles is about good music and creativity for the artists. It’s more an artists label than it is my label anyway. I don’t even want to earn the rights to the tracks in case someone blows up big and basically gets offered like a million dollars or whatever from Mac for a tune in a commercial. I’m not gonna be the one who’s like, yeah man, I’m gonna take fifty per cent of that or whatever. I honestly don’t believe that’s right man, ‘cause I didn’t create that piece of music. So it’s an artists’ label.

W: What do you set out to do when you play live? Are you one of those guys who just goes out there and tries to get people to shake their arses or do you put a little more thought into it than that?

T: I put a lot of thought into it. First and foremost, the most important thing about your set when you go performing is the moment when you’re done because, are people going to remember this? That is the most important thing. Because if people remember it, then they’re going to talk about it, and they’re not going to just talk about it for a week, or whatever, they’re gonna talk about it until you show up the next time when it’s time for you to make another impression. And also, in particular for first time listeners, you never get a second chance of doing your first impression. And a first impression is really, really important. If someone’s made their mind up about something, it’s really hard to get ‘em to change that. So I put a lot of time into it. I’ll check out a couple of weeks before I go on tour, make sure I have the freshest selection - try and stay away from the obvious anthems - and pretty much come with about ninety per cent music that no one’s ever heard before. And I think the whole challenge in that, when you play to a crowd of people who are expecting something from you and you’re also going to introduce them to music, that is completely fresh that they haven’t heard of, to provoke an actual feeling of appreciation is pretty hard when they’re not familiar with any of the stuff. So it’s a massive challenge for me to go out and pretty much just try and bring ‘em what I think is the best music from this scene, the most cutting edge and at the same time perform. So I love it mate, I love being not necessarily in the spotlight, but being on the spot and having to sort of prove my worth. And that’s what keeps me going really.

W: What is it about scratching that you like?

T: Well, I used to be a hip hop DJ. Well, to be honest with you, I used to DJ everything. When I first started off in this youth club that we had locally when I was twelve years old, they had this music group that were pretty much taking care of the entertainment or whatever at the end of the night and at that time I saw scratching on TV for the first time and I was just amazed man, because in my growing up there was one tune that changed my life. It was the Beat Street Breakdown and Beat Streets by Grandmaster Mellie Mel and Furious Five and in the intro of that tune there is this scratching pattern but as a kid I never knew that, I never heard that sound before, I thought it was an instrument. But then I saw that on TV as a twelve-year-old and realized that the sound I enjoyed hearing the most growing up was actually the sound of a record being pulled back and forth - that did something to me. So I think my life was pretty much mapped out that way. Because I wasn’t a producer at first, I was a DJ. I never really wanted to produce, but that’s another story. So basically what I did, I grabbed my dad’s turntable and I an old tape recorder that had something that looked like a fader as the volume control, so I connected that turntable through the tape recorder by hotwiring it and using the volume control to learn myself how to scratch. So yeah man, that’s just it. I just love to use it, not as an instrument, I don’t wanna say that because it’s a cliché, but just like a supplement, just to keep it a little more interesting from time to time.

W: That’s pretty much covered all the questions I had here for you. I guess what would you like to be remembered for do you reckon?

T: Just to be someone that kind of, not stood out, but just someone that was part of creating something brand new. That’s it. And that is also my aim, to like, when I’m gone from this place or whatever I want my legacy to be that he was a big part or maybe even a creator of this you know. And that’s what I want. And I won’t stop till I’ve gotten there. Even when I’m sixty, I’m still gonna try and push things. I’ve had millions of chances to sell out. I get them every week. But I just won’t do it. It’s just not in my nature man.

__________________
|-|
hustlin l. ist offline   Mit Zitat antworten
Sponsored Links
Alt 30.06.2004, 09:36   #2
hustlin l.
Hardcore Head
 
Benutzerbild von hustlin l.
 
Registriert seit: 17.09.2003
Beiträge: 8.959
Sehr schönes Interview!
Teebee Album im September mit Liquid Light
Phace EP (big up yourself!!!) usw.

__________________
|-|

Geändert von hustlin l. (30.06.2004 um 09:44 Uhr)
hustlin l. ist offline   Mit Zitat antworten
Alt 30.06.2004, 09:43   #3
kai@future-music
Administrator
 
Benutzerbild von kai@future-music
 
Registriert seit: 04.06.2001
Beiträge: 7.758
Zitat:
T: Phace? What the German? I f**k LOVE him man. I love him. I’ve got an EP of him coming out, I’ve got four tracks. It’s Now, Brainwave, Response Signal and Vitamin P. I might even drop it as Subtitles 40 because I love his tracks so much. The guy is unbelievable. He’s like, such a nice guy, as he’s got his world divided into where he has his entire kind of job life, his girlfriend, and he’s being all proper and like living the normal life and then there’s the drum ‘n’ bass side to him. And he’s just so happy just to be on Subtitles. And he’s like, mate this is as far as I want to go I just want to be on Subtitles because I basically tell him that you come on my label, because his production is so good anyway, that I just tell him that it doesn’t matter what you do, because I know it’s gonna be good and I’m not going to interfere on your creativity. So whatever you do, if you wanna put it out I’m gonna put it out no questions asked.
Ahhh... Flo... wicked!
So was liest man doch gerne. Congrats!
__________________
Future - www.future-music.net

Germany's online magazine for Drum'n'Bass, Jungle, Breakbeat
news, forum, events, DJ-mixes, history, merchandising,
interviews, features, charts, reviews & more ...
kai@future-music ist offline   Mit Zitat antworten
Alt 30.06.2004, 11:35   #4
g-smoke
Silver Head
 
Benutzerbild von g-smoke
 
Registriert seit: 02.01.2002
Ort: mainhattan
Beiträge: 897
Thumbs up big bad things

nice one!

die lp wird definitiv sehr dick!

und zu phace kann ich nur sagen: hammertracks! BIG THINGS BWOYZ!
__________________
get ill baby!

l system killaz | sidechain music l giana-brotherz | spun | leetradio l dnbnation l trackdonalds |
g-smoke ist offline   Mit Zitat antworten
Alt 30.06.2004, 11:45   #5
hustlin l.
Hardcore Head
 
Benutzerbild von hustlin l.
 
Registriert seit: 17.09.2003
Beiträge: 8.959
ich hoff, dass 'Follow the Leader' auf der LP is
__________________
|-|
hustlin l. ist offline   Mit Zitat antworten
Alt 30.06.2004, 13:03   #6
phace
Platinum Head
 
Registriert seit: 30.10.2001
Ort: earth
Beiträge: 3.162
nope, soweit ich weiß kommt follow the leader als single mit ner geilen freshen teebee+calyx flipseite as well
__________________
www.phace.eu
www.neosignal.de
phace ist offline   Mit Zitat antworten
Alt 30.06.2004, 13:11   #7
hustlin l.
Hardcore Head
 
Benutzerbild von hustlin l.
 
Registriert seit: 17.09.2003
Beiträge: 8.959
Zitat:
Zitat von phace
nope, soweit ich weiß kommt follow the leader als single mit ner geilen freshen teebee+calyx flipseite as well
jo thx für die Info....
is die 12" für '04 geplant?

Auf die Flip bin ich auch ma gespannt.
__________________
|-|
hustlin l. ist offline   Mit Zitat antworten
Alt 30.06.2004, 13:32   #8
phace
Platinum Head
 
Registriert seit: 30.10.2001
Ort: earth
Beiträge: 3.162
hab leider kein plan wann. und die flip is sick indeed :]
__________________
www.phace.eu
www.neosignal.de
phace ist offline   Mit Zitat antworten
Alt 30.06.2004, 13:34   #9
homebass
Silver Head
 
Registriert seit: 09.10.2003
Ort: Hamburg
Beiträge: 719
sehr schönes interview, viele wahre worte, eigenständige linie der mann...teebee ist und bleibt ein ganz großer player für meinen geschmack...

und ein bigup an phace...es scheint, als ob endlich auch deutsche produzenten mal etwas mehr zum zuge kommen, es gibt sie also hierzulande...die qualität!!!!!

mittlerweile reicht die englische staatsbürgerschaft halt nicht mehr aus, um im drum'n bass bizz weiter zu kommen und das ist auch gut so.

das stimmt doch alles sehr positiv für die zukunft!!!!!!!!!!!!!!
__________________
www.destination-recordings.com
www.myspace.com/destinationrecordings
www.myspace.com/euphoriadb
homebass ist offline   Mit Zitat antworten
Alt 30.06.2004, 13:49   #10
hustlin l.
Hardcore Head
 
Benutzerbild von hustlin l.
 
Registriert seit: 17.09.2003
Beiträge: 8.959
Zitat:
Zitat von phace
hab leider kein plan wann. und die flip is sick indeed :]

kannst ja mal nachfragen
__________________
|-|
hustlin l. ist offline   Mit Zitat antworten
Alt 30.06.2004, 13:54   #11
SAIGON
Diamond Head
 
Benutzerbild von SAIGON
 
Registriert seit: 30.12.2001
Ort: direkt aus dem knast du spast
Beiträge: 5.005
held








wie schwul ist ne mindesttextlänge, manchmal reicht ein wort um alles zu sgen.
aber bitte nfvnviöaodnoisbvgyjkfdlaeiwrughfsdjkkdslaoeirhgkfj ksdoiuihgkfnksdoiuhgkjdksdaoriehgkfdjdfhbnskaldjfh fvncmslödkjehgbvncmsaökdejhgbvncmsasökdjehgnvkdfei irrksooirhgjfdkdsloorejgjfdmdskijgk
__________________
die medien sind doch wie das wetter..nur daß das wetter von menschen gemacht wird.
SAIGON ist offline   Mit Zitat antworten
Alt 30.06.2004, 18:30   #12
Hendriks
Hardcore Head
 
Benutzerbild von Hendriks
 
Registriert seit: 24.10.2001
Ort: calgary, wilder westen
Beiträge: 9.761
Zitat:
Zitat von homebass
und ein bigup an phace...es scheint, als ob endlich auch deutsche produzenten mal etwas mehr zum zuge kommen, es gibt sie also hierzulande...die qualität!!!!!
Die Qualität gibt's hier doch schon lange! Nur wird sie im Ausland meistens eher entdeckt als im eigenen Land...
__________________
The overall situation is not satisfying!
Hendriks ist offline   Mit Zitat antworten
Alt 30.06.2004, 18:38   #13
Steppsen
Forum Freak
 
Benutzerbild von Steppsen
 
Registriert seit: 02.09.2002
Ort: Saar-G-Beat / NK-Town
Beiträge: 17.572
...dickes interview...vorallem was die länge betrifft...

...und zum thema phace brauch ich nix mehr zu sagen...einfuch nur alle daumen inkl. der zehen nach oben bitte...
__________________
[Printwerbung is out]
Steppsen ist offline   Mit Zitat antworten
Alt 30.06.2004, 19:20   #14
homebass
Silver Head
 
Registriert seit: 09.10.2003
Ort: Hamburg
Beiträge: 719
Zitat:
Zitat von Hendriks
Die Qualität gibt's hier doch schon lange! Nur wird sie im Ausland meistens eher entdeckt als im eigenen Land...
das es hier genügend qualität gibt, weiß ich selber auch
nur daß deutsche produktionen im ausland eher entdeckt werden als hierzulande bezweifle ich mal eher...ich bin auch der letzte, der sagt, daß es hier keine qualität gäbe...wollte eigentlich nur damit sagen, daß es endlich auch mal etwas gesehen und honoriert wird, was bei uns hier in good old germoney so produziert wird...da hast du den post wohl leicht mißverstanden...
__________________
www.destination-recordings.com
www.myspace.com/destinationrecordings
www.myspace.com/euphoriadb
homebass ist offline   Mit Zitat antworten
Alt 01.07.2004, 14:47   #15
Hendriks
Hardcore Head
 
Benutzerbild von Hendriks
 
Registriert seit: 24.10.2001
Ort: calgary, wilder westen
Beiträge: 9.761
Denk ich trotzdem nicht. Wenn ich denke, was Panacea vor 3-4 Jahren in den USA zB für Aufsehen mit seinen Tunes erregt hat, als er hier noch der Asiarsch war. Oder Syncopix, top Kram aus Deutschland. Da flippt aber keiner rum, wenn von denen was neues auf Hospital kommt.
Liegt aber wohl eher daran, dass Clownstep mehr angesagt ist...
__________________
The overall situation is not satisfying!
Hendriks ist offline   Mit Zitat antworten
Alt 01.07.2004, 16:27   #16
homebass
Silver Head
 
Registriert seit: 09.10.2003
Ort: Hamburg
Beiträge: 719
@ hendriks: ausnahmen bestätigen die regel!!!!

generell ist es aber glaube ich trotzdem schwer, gerade in uk als deutscher fuß zu fassen, und so viele beispiele fallen mir da zuminest spontan auf drum'n bass bezogen auch nicht ein...außer die von dir genannten...

naja, hauptsache es tut sich was, das ist ja das erfreuliche und eigentlich auch nur das, was ich sagen wollte...

und dieses unwort des jahres "clownstep" kann ich nicht mehr hören...
genauso wie darkdschangl, neojumpup, blablastep oder sonstige müllige kategorisierungen ohne substanz, die irgendjemand mal in den raum geworfen hat und niemandem etwas sagen, außer den leuten, die sich dauernd wie wir hier in irgendwelchen dummen foren tummeln...ist aber
__________________
www.destination-recordings.com
www.myspace.com/destinationrecordings
www.myspace.com/euphoriadb
homebass ist offline   Mit Zitat antworten
Alt 01.07.2004, 16:46   #17
JVXP
Hardcore Head
 
Registriert seit: 20.01.2002
Ort: 科隆
Beiträge: 9.288
Also ich kann C-Step echt nicht oft genug hören. Ist wahrscheinlich die beste Wortfindung seit Drum & Bass. Außerdem ist das die blanke Wahrheit. JEder sagt "Ich höre kein Clownstep" aber in Wirklichkeit wissen die meistn nicht, wie sich das überhaupt charakterisiert. Mir sind Schranzer lieber als C-Stepper!!!
__________________
"Ich distanzier mich von allem, was JVXP jemals geschrieben hat. :)"
JVXP ist offline   Mit Zitat antworten
Alt 01.07.2004, 17:09   #18
JoeY2k
Gold Head
 
Registriert seit: 09.07.2002
Ort: Dresden
Beiträge: 1.559
beim clowncore wirds dann richtig ungemüdlich
__________________
"..der rest möchte feiern. meistens reicht dazu schon ziemlich viel jump up und billiges bier."
JoeY2k ist offline   Mit Zitat antworten
Alt 01.07.2004, 19:14   #19
Hendriks
Hardcore Head
 
Benutzerbild von Hendriks
 
Registriert seit: 24.10.2001
Ort: calgary, wilder westen
Beiträge: 9.761
Zitat:
Zitat von homebass
generell ist es aber glaube ich trotzdem schwer, gerade in uk als deutscher fuß zu fassen, und so viele beispiele fallen mir da zuminest spontan auf drum'n bass bezogen auch nicht ein...
Vielleicht ist das auch der springende Punkt....IN UK.....warum?
Ist ein Tune nur hot, wenn er auf Hardware, Ram oder nem anderen Label aus England kommt? Warum kucken immer noch alle nach England? Es gibt genug gute Labels mit super tunes, die einfach nicht beachtet werden, weil sie eben nicht auf nem UK Label kommen oder der Artist nicht in London oder Bristol wohnt.
Ich denke gerade heute, wo so unendlich viele Leute guten DnB jeglicher Richtung machen, wird immer noch viel zu viel nach England gekuckt.
Und mit Clownstep meine ich DnB, bei dem mir wirklich nichts anderes als Clowns einfallen. Lest mal das John B Interview in der aktuellen knowledge, wegen diesem Blandwagon Poos tune. Das war ein Witz! Ne Stunde gängige Samples aneinanderklatschen, um Leuten die Einfallslosigkeit ihres Schaffens vor Augen zu halten. Trotzdem wird das Ding ne Bombe und John Bs bestverkaufter Tune! Oder dieses Hools 2004 Teil, dass sowas überhaupt rauskommt. Ich kann echt nicht nachvollziehen, wie man so etwas gut finden kann!
Ich will dich nicht angreifen und denke auch nicht, dass du genau so engstirnig bist. Aber langsam nervt es echt nur noch, dass selbst in 2004 DnB Marke UK das Mass aller Dinge sein soll, wo gerade so viel Scheisse von der Insel kommt.
__________________
The overall situation is not satisfying!
Hendriks ist offline   Mit Zitat antworten
Alt 01.07.2004, 19:41   #20
homebass
Silver Head
 
Registriert seit: 09.10.2003
Ort: Hamburg
Beiträge: 719
Zitat:
Zitat von Hendriks
Vielleicht ist das auch der springende Punkt....IN UK.....warum?
Ist ein Tune nur hot, wenn er auf Hardware, Ram oder nem anderen Label aus England kommt? Warum kucken immer noch alle nach England? Es gibt genug gute Labels mit super tunes, die einfach nicht beachtet werden, weil sie eben nicht auf nem UK Label kommen oder der Artist nicht in London oder Bristol wohnt.
Ich denke gerade heute, wo so unendlich viele Leute guten DnB jeglicher Richtung machen, wird immer noch viel zu viel nach England gekuckt.
Und mit Clownstep meine ich DnB, bei dem mir wirklich nichts anderes als Clowns einfallen. Lest mal das John B Interview in der aktuellen knowledge, wegen diesem Blandwagon Poos tune. Das war ein Witz! Ne Stunde gängige Samples aneinanderklatschen, um Leuten die Einfallslosigkeit ihres Schaffens vor Augen zu halten. Trotzdem wird das Ding ne Bombe und John Bs bestverkaufter Tune! Oder dieses Hools 2004 Teil, dass sowas überhaupt rauskommt. Ich kann echt nicht nachvollziehen, wie man so etwas gut finden kann!
Ich will dich nicht angreifen und denke auch nicht, dass du genau so engstirnig bist. Aber langsam nervt es echt nur noch, dass selbst in 2004 DnB Marke UK das Mass aller Dinge sein soll, wo gerade so viel Scheisse von der Insel kommt.
sorry, ich schaue überhaupt nicht nur nach england, das war bloß eine feststellung meinerseits...wenn du mal meine sets anhören würdest, müßtest du feststellen, daß da keine einzige scheibe von diesen gängigen labels und artists so far drauf ist...ich habe seit jahren weder ne ram, ne renegade oder dillinja und artverwandtes gekauft, ich habe von eben genannten im schnitt zwei bis drei scheiben überhaupt...GENAU WEIL für mich von der insel fast nur uninteressanter schrott kommt, zumindest von den gängigen labels...daß man natürlich auch scheiben z.b. kauft, die halt aus england sind, da kommt man nicht dran vorbei, kommt aber drauf an von welchem artist...ich kaufe halt das, was mir gefällt und wähle nicht nach nationalität meine scheiben aus...

und in punkto produzieren war das halt nur ein beispiel und wie gesagt ne feststellung...hat überhaupt nix mit dem punkt zu tun, den du angesprochen hast, nämlich: daß man nachwievor nur nach england schielt und das das maß aller dinge ist...für mich sowieso nicht...wars auch noch nie, nur so btw...

es passiert gerade auf der ganzen welt genug, in russland, australien, usa...auf allen kontinenten der erde...warum sollte ich mich auf UK fixieren?????
das tun andere für mich und erfüllen genau das, was du oben angesprochen hast...leider!!!!! das meinte ich aber so nicht!!!!
abgesehen davon sehe ich die sache genauso wie du sie ja auch schon geschildert hast, ich glaube wir reden hier unglücklicherweise immer wieder aneinander vorbei...
__________________
www.destination-recordings.com
www.myspace.com/destinationrecordings
www.myspace.com/euphoriadb
homebass ist offline   Mit Zitat antworten
Alt 02.07.2004, 02:42   #21
Fernando Alonso
Junior Head
 
Registriert seit: 23.03.2003
Ort: Am Roten Stern
Beiträge: 27
UK is schon seit 2000 totaler Abfall. Recycle´n wird bei denen sicherlich ganz froni GROSSSS geschrieben.
__________________
Le Mans
Fernando Alonso ist offline   Mit Zitat antworten
Alt 02.07.2004, 02:56   #22
Dreas
Guest
 
Beiträge: n/a
es ist einfach mal so, dass england der topspot für drum&bass ist, weniger wegen der musik, sondern wegen der aufmerksamkeit für drum&bass. erstens fing dort alles an, und diesen nimbus wird die dortige szene auch noch in 20 jahren für sich beanspruchen können (siehe techno und detroit), zweitens gibt es dort ein medieninteresse, was hierzulande gar nicht gegeben ist, drittens haben die britischen labels die meiste kohle, bzw. das größte potenzial, den stuff auch an den mann zu bringen und ordentlich werbung für das produkt zu machen. pendulum z.B. wären bestimmt nicht so groß rausgekommen, wenn sie ihre tunes auf low profile rausgebracht hätten oder d.kay, hätte er "barcelona" an irgendein label von dylan gegeben oder gar auf einem österreichischen label released.

das ist doch überall so im leben, die deutschen schauen auf die briten, die polen auf die deutschen, die hallenser auf die hamburger...
  Mit Zitat antworten
Alt 02.07.2004, 03:23   #23
Fernando Alonso
Junior Head
 
Registriert seit: 23.03.2003
Ort: Am Roten Stern
Beiträge: 27
Zitat:
Zitat von Dreas

das ist doch überall so im leben, die deutschen schauen auf die briten, die polen auf die deutschen, die hallenser auf die hamburger...
Ganz großes Kino!
Sag mal lebst du noch im Mittelalter?:-) (Sie servieren..und ihr rührt die Scheisse um)
......
__________________
Le Mans
Fernando Alonso ist offline   Mit Zitat antworten
Alt 02.07.2004, 10:13   #24
mista fox
Silver Head
 
Benutzerbild von mista fox
 
Registriert seit: 25.09.2002
Ort: Stresslingen
Beiträge: 552
Hat richtig gutgetan, das Interview zu lesen. Das ist einer von den Guten
__________________
Kultur-Evolution seit 1999
mista fox ist offline   Mit Zitat antworten
Alt 02.07.2004, 11:18   #25
baze.djunkiii
Guest
 
Beiträge: n/a
Zitat:
Zitat von Dreas
es ist einfach mal so, dass england der topspot für drum&bass ist, weniger wegen der musik, sondern wegen der aufmerksamkeit für drum&bass. erstens fing dort alles an, und diesen nimbus wird die dortige szene auch noch in 20 jahren für sich beanspruchen können (siehe techno und detroit), zweitens gibt es dort ein medieninteresse, was hierzulande gar nicht gegeben ist, drittens haben die britischen labels die meiste kohle, bzw. das größte potenzial, den stuff auch an den mann zu bringen und ordentlich werbung für das produkt zu machen...
und weiter? nur weil hollywood der topspot für filmedrehen ist, gibts da nicht unbedingt das beste kino. vielleicht das populärste, aber das wars dann auch schon.
  Mit Zitat antworten
Alt 02.07.2004, 12:47   #26
Dreas
Guest
 
Beiträge: n/a
Zitat:
Zitat von baze.djunkiii
und weiter? nur weil hollywood der topspot für filmedrehen ist, gibts da nicht unbedingt das beste kino. vielleicht das populärste, aber das wars dann auch schon.
erst lesen, dann denken, dann schreiben schnuckelchen: ich habe gründe genannt, warum alles nach england schielt. wenn du nicht so borniert wärest, würdest du vielleicht mal kurz nachdenken, aber so ich habe nirgendwo behauptet, dass dort die beste mucke herkommt.
hollywood ist ein gutes beispiel, in der mode ist es vielleicht mailand oder paris, beim hip hop new york, beim techno detroit... die leute suchen sich immer was aus, was in ihren augen angeblich cool ist.
  Mit Zitat antworten
Alt 02.07.2004, 15:00   #27
baze.djunkiii
Guest
 
Beiträge: n/a
deine argumente hab ich durchaus verstanden, nur empfinde ich keins davon als so gewichtig - mittlerweile selbst das "birthplace of d'n'b" nicht mehr - als das es den ewigen blick nach england in meinen augen noch sinnvoll begründen kann. die alten helden sind müde, wird enorm zeit für nen generationswechsel.
  Mit Zitat antworten
Alt 02.07.2004, 20:03   #28
Hendriks
Hardcore Head
 
Benutzerbild von Hendriks
 
Registriert seit: 24.10.2001
Ort: calgary, wilder westen
Beiträge: 9.761
@homebass: Ich hab doch gesagt, dass ich nicht denke, dass du so engstirnig bist! Das war allgemein gemeint
__________________
The overall situation is not satisfying!
Hendriks ist offline   Mit Zitat antworten
Alt 02.07.2004, 23:47   #29
homebass
Silver Head
 
Registriert seit: 09.10.2003
Ort: Hamburg
Beiträge: 719
@ hendriks: kein theman, hab ich schon mitgekriegt, mußte nur meinen senf dann trotzdem auch noch loswerden
__________________
www.destination-recordings.com
www.myspace.com/destinationrecordings
www.myspace.com/euphoriadb
homebass ist offline   Mit Zitat antworten
Antwort

Lesezeichen


Aktive Benutzer in diesem Thema: 1 (Registrierte Benutzer: 0, Gäste: 1)
 
Themen-Optionen
Ansicht

Forumregeln
Es ist dir nicht erlaubt, neue Themen zu verfassen.
Es ist dir nicht erlaubt, auf Beiträge zu antworten.
Es ist dir nicht erlaubt, Anhänge hochzuladen.
Es ist dir nicht erlaubt, deine Beiträge zu bearbeiten.

BB-Code ist an.
Smileys sind an.
[IMG] Code ist aus.
HTML-Code ist aus.



Alle Zeitangaben in WEZ +2. Es ist jetzt 19:16 Uhr.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.9 (Deutsch)
Copyright ©2000 - 2017, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.
& future-music.net, Germany.