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Alt 09.07.2004, 17:38   #1
unrest_mc
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the mc- more popular than ever....

The MC is a more popular figure than ever. So where did the MC come from – and how can you become one? We show you how to spit venom with the best of 'em...




Today, the MC is here to stay. Get on any bus or Tube in any city centre and it’s not unusual to find crews of youth sat at the back, freestyling. Talk to anyone under the age of 21 these days and they all want to be DJs, the way their counterparts ten years ago wanted to be DJs and their parents all wanted to be footballers.




Undoubtedly a major factor in the rise of popularity of MCing as a pastime, artform or whatever you want to call it has been the success of MC-led groups like So Solid Crew, Pay As You Go Cartel and the rest of ’em: the MC is becoming to UK garage what the rapper is to hip hop, moving from just another factor in the equation to the centrepiece of the show. And as this happens, MCs doing the old-fashioned ‘working the crowd’ thing get more and more attention, too.

According to Timmi Magic of the Dreem Teem, “most MCs are all right to work with, but some don’t know when to shut up.” That’s as may be, but one thing’s for sure: the MC is here to stay.




Any DJ playing out in clubland will have more than once been faced with a tough crowd. Mix after mix, tune after tune, it makes no difference if they’re just not up for it on the night. If that happens to you and you’re a house or techno DJ you’re on your own: hoping the next tune you drop will set the dance on fire is about all you can do. But if you play ragga, old skool hardcore, drum & bass, R&B or UK garage there’s another hope: the MC.

A good MC can do wonders for a night that’s sagging in the middle – which is probably why the MC’s popularity has undergone a massive resurgence in the past couple of years. A few years ago, having an MC at a club or party would have been considered almost quaint, a throwback to the rave era. Now, the MC is even spreading to other genres outside those with which he’s normally associated.

The MC is, in fact, probably a more popular figure on the dance scene than he’s ever been before. But where did the man on the mic come from? Allow iDJ to be your guide to the roots of MC culture…

Roots manoeuvres
As with many aspects of DJing, MCing came from the Jamaican soundsystems of the ’70s, where freestyling ‘DJs’ (as they were known – the guy actually playing the records being the ‘selector’) would chat on the mic about everything and anything the punters wanted to hear. As the ragga/breakbeat scene developed in the UK, the open mics were picked up and the UK MC phenomena was born.

The first MC to really make a name for himself in the UK was Top Buzz, at warehouse raves way back in the mid–’80s. Quickly, others followed suit, notably Skibadee and GQ, to name just two names that keep popping up in conversation when talking about those old skool days.

It wasn’t until the late ’80s/early ’90s when the MC became a part of mainstream clubbing and commercial all-night raves, though. Back then there’d be almost as many MCs as DJs being advertised on the flyers, because the MC had added an extra twist to your average party. The lyrics and rhymes at this time were mainly about the drugs of the day: ecstasy, whizz, acid, they all got a mention in most MCs’ lines.

These catchy one- or two-liners got the crowd singing along with the MC on the stage. With the full attention of the ravers focused on the man with the mic, he or she could take the party in any direction, up if they were good or down if they were bad. It all added to the atmosphere and gave those who could wait long enough a way to get shouts out to mates and other crews. This became just part of the night: I can’t remember how many times I heard “Going out to the one arm Daniel, out there in West Drayton” shouted over a claimed 90K sound system in a field.

Over the next few years, the MC’s job became more and more important. Not only was the MC there to keep the crowd interested, worked up and focused on what was going on, but they developed more control over the night. Seeing when a tune being played had gone down well, the MC started to call for the rewind: telling the DJ to take it back to the top or asking the selecta to come again was the new found way to take the atmosphere through the roof. All of a sudden, the charged up ravers had a control over the DJ. If they liked the tune, via the MC they could influence the set – anthems were quickly singled out and the rewind soon became easy to predict.

As different music styles became more defined, so the MCs had to choose the way they wanted to go. As hardcore disappeared, most of the working MCs moved over to the new-born drum & bass scene, though for some this was short lived as first speed garage, then UK garage/two-step started to become more appealing.

Only a very few MCs work in both the UK garage and drum & bass scenes these days, as the pace is so different, especially now that D&B gets played so fast. You’re more likely to find garage MCs rambling a few lines to R&B, as this is becoming a popular part of the UKG DJ’s set, and a good MC will switch without even thinking about the change of pace.



Interview with MC KIE:


Making it big: MC Kie
It’s the UK garage scene where the MC is making most noise – just look at the number of MC-led records going straight in at the top of our commercial chart. We spoke to leading garage MC Kie to get a look at what it’s like to be a top MC

How long have you been an MC?
Kie: I practised for one year, spent a year in the jungle scene then moved into garage seven years ago.

How did you get your name?
Kie: It’s actually an anagram of my second name, McKie. All my friends said that’s what I should be called and it stuck.

How did you get started and why?
Kie: About eight years ago I was into raving, I went to D&B and jungle clubs all the time. I used to listen to MCs like Skibadee and remember their lyrics, then go home and practise in the garage until I developed my own style. I wanted to be on stage, just like them.

What other MCs do you most like to work with?
Kie: Sparks, Creed, Rankin, Blakey, CKP and the late Charlie Brown. I like what they do and we all know each other’s style, this helps us bounce off each other and really get the crowd going.

How do you come up with your lyrics?
Kie: My Lyrics are about reality, things that are going on around me now, and you can throw in some freestyle on the night.

What do you expect from a DJ?
Kie: Like a good DJ a good MC works in bars, 8 bars or 16 bars. My lyrics keep in time to this: I’m lucky as most DJs will know most of my classic rhymes and can cut the music up to give them more impact.

Plans for the future?
Kie: I’ve got loads going on, a few deals to sign soon, and the new record’s being released at the end of Feb. I’ll write for other people, and I’d like to keep my options open, in both the commercial scene and underground.

Worst MCing moment?
Kie: I walked on stage at a recent Sidewinder event and my fly was undone! Loads of people at the front could see and were pointing but I just carried on.
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Alt 09.07.2004, 17:42   #2
Steppsen
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du weißt ja garnicht was du damit grade angerichtet hast...



..mal warten was hierraus wird...

ontopic: ich finds gut...in gewissem masse...beide dj und mc...sollten sich die waage halten..als ein team fungieren...aber nix anderes sagt mr. kie am ende im interview...

"What do you expect from a DJ?
Kie: Like a good DJ a good MC works in bars, 8 bars or 16 bars. My lyrics keep in time to this: I’m lucky as most DJs will know most of my classic rhymes and can cut the music up to give them more impact."

/\
||

Das es auch mal so gehen kann...das werden hier nur die meisten verneinen...
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Alt 09.07.2004, 17:45   #3
MC Sinista
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garage is ja auch was anderes
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Alt 09.07.2004, 18:14   #4
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gratulation. sie sind der tausendste kunde, der eine mc diskussion starten will und haben hiermit einen kugelschreiber gewonnen.
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Alt 09.07.2004, 21:00   #5
baze.djunkiii
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guter artikel, sinniges interview - auch wenn mensch die meinungen nicht zwingend teilt. trotzdem hätte das kein extra thread werden müssen.

@mod's: mc-threads zusammenlegen udn als sticky oben im forum lassen... ?
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Alt 09.07.2004, 22:05   #6
mr.burns
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Zitat:
Zitat von baze.djunkiii

@mod's: mc-threads zusammenlegen udn als sticky oben im forum lassen... ?

als sticky unten und alles ist im butter!
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Alt 10.07.2004, 02:26   #7
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Zitat:
Zitat von mr.burns
als sticky unten und alles ist in butter!
genau so siehts aus !

Zitat:
Zitat von mcsteppb
dj und mc...sollten sich die waage halten..als ein team fungieren...

Geändert von Guest (10.07.2004 um 02:29 Uhr)
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Alt 12.07.2004, 08:08   #8
Steppsen
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ja was is jetzt...dacht ich mir gehts du mal 3 Tage net online nd schon is die Disskussion hier explodiert...nix is...

...sollte sich das Thema doch erschöpft haben?!?!?
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Alt 12.07.2004, 09:25   #9
unrest_mc
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Zitat:
Zitat von MC Sinista
garage is ja auch was anderes

KIE war vorher Drum & Bass MC
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